Fetch Pet Insurance Coverage

Here’s everything you need to know about pet insurance coverage with Fetch by The Dodo.

A chihuahua holding a magnifying glass up to their eye.

What's covered?

Fetch covers new injuries and illnesses that occur after the waiting period ends: things like foreign object ingestion, broken teeth, ACL ruptures, kidney disease… As long as it's not a pre-existing condition, we’re there for just about anything that happens. We provide the most comprehensive coverage in the industry, and it's all standard in your plan.

What we cover

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Reset

Treatment for injuries

The cost of veterinary treatment when your pet gets hurt. Injuries can range from cuts and foreign object ingestion to broken bones and ACL ruptures.

Treatment for illnesses

The cost of veterinary treatment when your pet gets sick. Illnesses can range from vomiting, diarrhea, and urinary tract infections to heart disease or cancer.

Sick-visit exam fees

Every sick visit comes with an exam fee, which can be around $50 - $250. We cover those exam fees for you. Not all providers do.

Every tooth & gum

We cover injury and disease in every adult tooth, not just the canines. Not all providers do. Plus, you get full coverage for periodontal disease (the most common disease in dogs and cats), oral tumors, trauma, and more.

Breed-specific issues

Not all providers cover medical conditions linked to breed, like breathing problems in French bulldogs or kidney stones in Burmese. We do.

Alternative & holistic care

We cover treatments like acupuncture, aromatherapy, chiropractic and homeopathic therapy administered by a vet to treat an injury or illness. Not all providers do.

Emergency vet visits

Treatment at licensed emergency veterinary clinics anywhere in the U.S. or Canada.

Specialists

Treatment by licensed veterinary specialists including, but not limited to, orthopedists, oncologists, orthodontists and cardiologists.

Diagnostic tests

Tests performed or prescribed by a vet to help diagnose an injury or illness. Diagnostic tests can range from blood tests and urinalysis to MRIs and ultrasound.

Hospitalization

Overnight stays at a licensed veterinary hospital anywhere in the U.S. or Canada for treatment, monitoring or further testing.

Physical therapy

Treatments including, but not limited to, hydrotherapy, laser, underwater treadmill, kinesiotherapy, land-based exercise, massage, stretching and electrical stimulation administered by a vet to treat an injury or illness.

Behavioral therapy

Consultations with a vet to diagnose and treat behavioral disorders including, but not limited to, aggression, separation anxiety or phobias. Covered up to $1,000 per year.

Virtual vet visits

Remote telehealth treatment by a vet by means including, but not limited to, phone calls, email, text messaging or video chat. Covered up to $1,000 per year, no copay required.

Supplements

Any non-prescription medicinal substance, including but not limited to nutraceuticals, vitamins and herbal medicines, that a veterinarian recommends for the treatment of an injury or illness.

Boarding fees

The cost of boarding your pet at a licensed facility while you’re in the hospital. Covered up to $1,000 per year.

Advertising & reward

The cost of advertising that your pet is missing and paying a reasonable reward for finding them. Covered up to $1,000 per year.

There are no articles that match your search.

Try again
A puppy excitedly playing with a ball.

What’s not covered?

Pet insurance covers future accidents and illnesses — the stuff you can’t see coming. Here’s everything you need to know about what we don’t cover.

There are no articles that match your search.

Try again

Routine and preventive care are not covered.
We don’t currently cover routine and preventive care: things like vaccinations, checkups, spaying/neutering, or teeth cleaning.

Pre-existing conditions are not covered.
A pre-existing condition is anything that happened before you enrolled or during the waiting period. We cover new injuries and illnesses that occur after the waiting period is over.

Claims filed more than 90 days after treatment are not covered.
You have 90 days from the date on your invoice to submit a claim. If you submit a claim later than that, it won’t be covered.

Prescription food is not covered.
We cover supplements that are recommended by your vet as treatment for a covered condition, but not prescription food.

Anything that happened before or during the waiting period is not covered.
As a reminder, the waiting period ends 15 days after the effective date of your policy. We’ll send you an email the day the waiting period ends.

What vets can I use?

We don’t have networks, so you can use your existing vet or visit any other licensed vet in the U.S. or Canada (including specialists and emergency clinics). We also cover up to $1,000 per policy year in virtual vet visits via text, email, call or video.

A greyhound with a toothache and a bandage wrapped around his head.

What is the waiting period?

The waiting period is a 15-day period that begins on the effective date of your policy. We’ll email you as soon as it starts — look out for an email with the subject line “PLEASE REVIEW: Waiting period in effect.”

Here’s what you need to know about the waiting period:

  • Any claims incurred during the waiting period will not be covered.

  • Any injury or illness that occurs during the waiting period will be considered a pre-existing condition, which means it won’t be eligible for coverage.

  • We cover new injuries and illnesses that occur after the waiting period is over.

There’s also a 6-month waiting period before injuries of the hips and knees can be covered.

You can waive the waiting period for knee injuries by having your pet examined by a vet in the first 30 days of their policy to determine that they don’t have any relevant pre-existing conditions.

Nervous cat doesn't want to get into their crate.

How do I maximize my coverage?

The key to making the most of Fetch is to get your pet a checkup at the vet as soon as you enroll. If you haven’t scheduled a checkup yet, please contact your vet to schedule one ASAP.

Why do I need to get my pet a checkup?

You’ll be asked to upload your pet’s medical records when you submit a claim. You get those records at a checkup. They show us your pet’s medical history and let us see what we can cover, which allows us to process your claim quickly.

What kind of medical records should I ask for?

To make sure you get the right kind of medical records, tell your vet you need “SOAP notes.” The records you receive should include any exam notes and lab results. Please keep the medical records somewhere safe so you have them when you need them.

What happens if I don’t get my pet a checkup?

Without the medical records from a checkup, we might not be able to process your claims at all. (In other words: There’s a chance we won’t be able to pay you back.)

Is the checkup covered?

Checkups are considered routine and preventive care, which we don’t cover. But getting your pet a checkup is the key to maximizing your coverage — it ensures that we’ll be able to cover as many new conditions as possible.

Trusted by no-kill shelters in the U.S. and Canada

Get your price