What fruits can dogs eat

Don’t let their puppy-dog eyes convince you grapes are a snack that should be shared. You can cave when it comes to blueberries, though.

Safe foods (within reason)

Apples

Apples are high in fiber and vitamins and low in calories and fat. With your vet's OK, treat your pet to bite-sized pieces and avoid sharing the stem, seeds and core as they can be choking hazards and may contain cyanide, which is toxic for dogs (call your vet if they've eaten anything off-limits).
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Bananas

Bananas are low in cholesterol and calories and contain several nutrients like potassium (boosts energy), fiber (promotes a healthy gut) and magnesium (supports bone, muscle and nerve health). It’s best to avoid the banana peel as it’s harder for dogs’ stomachs to digest and can cause painful blockages in the gastrointestinal tract. Serve up this sweet snack in small, bite-sized slices.
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Blackberries

Blackberries are packed with several nutrients, including vitamin A (promotes vision, dental, coat and skin health), vitamin C (supports the immune system) and fiber (promotes a healthy gut). They’re also a great low-calorie snack. Too many blackberries can cause stomach issues and diarrhea, so serving them in moderation is best.

Blueberries

Blueberries are a healthy dog treat alternative (especially for training) because they’re bite-sized and low in calories. This fruit supports dogs’ immune systems, boosts energy, helps pups feel full and is an anti-inflammatory. Feel safe feeding these snacks to your pup often.

Cantaloupes

Cantaloupes are full of nutrients that help with red blood cell function, reduce inflammation and improve vision health. They’re also low in calories and hydrating. Before feeding cantaloupe to dogs, remove the seeds and rind to avoid choking hazards. Contact your vet and watch out for an upset stomach, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy and decreased appetite if your pup ate something they shouldn’t.

Coconuts

Coconut oil and meat are packed with nutrients that can boost dogs’ immune systems and coat and skin health. But, because coconuts are high in calories and fat, they should be served to your pup in moderation. Ask your vet before letting your dog drink coconut water, which contains a lot of potassium and could cause vomiting, diarrhea, decreased appetite and changes in energy level and behavior.

Cranberries

Cranberries are full of nutrients like antioxidants (protects cells from damage) and vitamin C (supports the immune system). Keep dogs away from cranberry sauce (it contains more sugar) and check the label before serving dried cranberries (may have more sugar or preservatives). Before serving raw cranberries, ask your vet how your dog’s age, size, activity level and health status may affect portion size.

Honeydew

Honeydew is full of nutrients that aid in brain function and promote a healthy gut. And, although this fruit is low in calories, it should always be served in moderation with the rind removed.

Mangos

Mangos contain nutrients that promote an active brain and healthy vision. But, the pit, skin and seeds are choking hazards and contain cyanide, so keep them away from your pup. If you think your dog ate cyanide, call your vet and watch out for difficulty breathing, red gums (a brick color) and shock. Serve bite-sized pieces in moderation because of their high sugar content.

Nectarines

Nectarines contain several nutrients, including potassium (boosts energy and maintains nerve and muscle health), fiber (promotes a healthy gut) and vitamin A (helps vision, dental, coat and skin health). Avoid serving the pit to your dog as it contains cyanide, which can cause difficulty breathing, red gums and shock. If your dog ate any poisonous parts, contact your vet.

Oranges

Oranges are high in vitamin C (supports the immune system), potassium (boosts energy) and fiber (promotes a healthy gut). Serve this fruit in moderation because of its high sugar and citrus content. Too much sugar can cause obesity and oral health issues, while citrus contains harmful essential oils. Skip the peel, seeds and stem when treating your pup because they can cause vomiting, diarrhea and skin irritation.

Peaches

Peaches are packed with nutrients that benefit pups’ immune systems, boost energy, support blood health and maintain healthy teeth and bone growth. Skip serving your pup the stems, leaves and pit as they contain cyanide, which can cause difficulty breathing, red gums (a brick color) and shock. The pit is a choking hazard, too, and should be kept away from your dog.

Pears

Pears can support dogs’ immune systems, boost energy and promote a healthy gut. Remove the seeds, stems and greenery before serving as they contain cyanide, which is poisonous to dogs and can cause difficulty breathing, red gums and shock.

Pineapples

Pineapples are packed with vitamin C (reduces inflammation and benefits brain function), vitamin B-6 (supports the immune and nervous system) and potassium (promotes a healthy gut). Share this fruit in moderation (and always remove the skin and rind first!) as its high sugar levels can cause obesity, poor oral health and cause stomach issues, including diarrhea. Avoid giving your dog dried and canned pineapple, which has more calories, sugar and preservatives.

Raspberries

Raspberries contain folic acid, which is essential for replicating cells. This fruit does contain xylitol, but only a small amount that is not toxic. Xylitol is a problem when it’s concentrated in products like sugar-free gum and certain marshmallow brands, but high levels aren’t found in foods from natural sources. Serve your dog raspberries on special occasions. If your dog does have a stomach ache after eating raspberries, contact your vet.

Strawberries

Strawberries are low in calories and packed with several nutrients that support gut health, promote bone, muscle and nerve health and encourage gastrointestinal health. But, strawberries are best served in moderation because they’re high in sugar and without the leaves and stem (which are harder for dogs’ stomachs to digest).
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Watermelon

Watermelon is packed with nutrients that support dogs’ immune and nervous systems, boost energy and promote vision, dental, coat and skin health. This fruit is very hydrating, too. Remove the rind and seeds before serving, as they could cause a painful blockage that can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, decreased appetite and lethargy. If any of these symptoms are present, contact your vet or visit a veterinary emergency clinic.

Unsafe foods (keep out of paw’s reach)

Cherries

While cherry skin isn’t toxic for dogs, the greenery, seeds and stem are because they contain cyanide — plus they can also create painful blockages. It’s best to avoid this fruit to keep your pup happy and healthy. If your dog ate a cherry, try to determine how much poisonous material they ate and contact your vet. Watch out for difficulty breathing, red gums and shock.

Grapes

All grapes (raisins, Zante currants and sultanas included) are toxic to dogs and can cause kidney failure. If your dog eats a grape, call your vet as they may want to induce vomiting, monitor your dog’s blood work, start therapy to protect your dog’s kidneys and treat them for signs of lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea and lack of appetite.

Lemons

Lemon skin, seeds and greenery contain psoralens and essential oils, which are toxic to dogs. If your pup eats a lemon, it may cause stomach issues in addition to symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea and skin irritation. There’s no real nutritional value in lemons, either, so it’s best to avoid this sour snack.

Can my dog eat: bananas

Bananas are low in cholesterol and calories and contain several nutrients. When it comes to snacking, offer your pup smaller, easily digestible pieces and keep the banana peel out of paw’s reach.

(Even though bananas are generally safe for dogs, always consult your vet before introducing a new food to their diet.)

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Always consult your vet before introducing your pet to new foods.

Not all “safe” foods are good for your dog to eat as is — make sure each bite is appropriately prepared (pay attention to cooking instructions, seasonings and ingredients) before treating your pup.

If at any point your dog negatively reacts to something they’ve eaten, call your vet or poison control immediately.

Don’t rely on these foods to improve your dog’s health without your vet’s guidance.

Check out our article on handling pet emergencies for more information.